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  1. #1
    Newbie
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    Default Dual port pci-e card low profile

    Hello,
    I will need a low profile pci-e nic to fit into a sff box.
    The nic should have 2 ports so I can use it for 2 different ISP's so I can load balance the box. In addition I would like this card to be based on intel or broadcom chip and not realtek. Any suggestions?
    Best,
    Spyros Samartzis

  2. #2
    Untangle Ninja
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    Jan 2011
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    Default

    Almost all dual port cards I've seen are low-profile. Here's all that I can think of:

    Tyan P1103 (Broadcom chips)
    Tyan P1203 (Intel chips)

    SuperMicro AOC-PG-I2+ (Intel chips)
    SuperMicro AOC-SG-I2 (Intel chips)

    Intel EXPI9402PT
    Intel E1G42ET

    (those are all PCIe x4 cards; if you need PCIe x1, the only choice I know of is a Startech card with Realtek chips)
    Last edited by johnsonx42; 05-29-2011 at 10:18 AM.

  3. #3
    Untangle Ninja dwasserman's Avatar
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    Default

    http://forums.untangle.com/hardware/...ased-nics.html

    PS:Sorry, I read pci-e too late, forget this link
    The world is divided into 10 kinds of people, who know binary and those not

  4. #4
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    Default

    Hello,
    the slot is a standard low-profile PCI Express x1 expansion slot
    Do you know any single port intel based cards as well?
    The model is Compaq 100eu Small Form Factor PC.
    Thanks,
    Spyros

  5. #5
    Master Untangler
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    Aug 2008
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    Default

    See this link here:

    http://forums.untangle.com/off-topic...bit-nic-2.html

    First post on the second page provides information on which Intel chipsets use the "hardware" Linux driver and which chipset uses the "software" driver. Then again, as per another post, it seems, with Intel chipsets, even the "software" ones provide "hardware" performance.

    I put those in quotes as there is debate as to what "hardware" and "software" really mean. If interested, here:

    http://forums.untangle.com/hardware/...-vs-intel.html

    Also, in case you happen to buy used and/or off the internet and install it, you can find out what chipset you are using on the NIC using commands found here:

    http://www.intel.com/support/network/sb/cs-008441.htm

    ethtool -i <ethernet no.> - find the driver version being used on a specific ethernet port

    lspci -v | grep Ethernet -A 1 - get the name of the network adapter and the hardware controller in use

  6. #6
    Untangle Ninja
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    Jan 2011
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    Default

    The Intel Gigabit CT Desktop Adapter works quite well, and is PCIe x1; I use it for my UT boxes that need a 3rd port. They also have a single port PT adapter that is PCIe x1, the rest are all x4. I really don't see any big benefit to spending 3x on the PT board vs the CT board.

  7. #7
    Untangle Ninja
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    Jan 2011
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    by the way, if you really must put a PCIe x4 card in an x1 slot, you can do so by carefully cutting out the back edge of the slot so that the card can hang out the back. Only if there's nothing on the motherboard behind the slot that would block the card, of course... if anything would touch but not actually block the card, you can protect the card edge with electrical tape. Yeah, this is a bit 'hacky', but sometimes it's necessary.

    The reduction in available bandwidth will not be significant for most reasonable purposes.

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