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  1. #11
    Untangler
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    Aug 2014
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    dhcp is the very first thing I disable on any new router because as I said, OSX Server handles all that, including the info about the default gateway. If anything because I don't really want to re-do all the static maps everytime we change router lol

    The wifi router isn't there to give us wifi, it has inadequate power... it's there to lock out of the network the isp router. The thing is so annoying to justify it, for example if the line is down and you fire up a browser with multiple tabs open, those will all be replaced by an error message, informing you that there is a problem with the line. Also the whole dhcp always on thing. Wifi is generously offered by one of the other 3 access points with upgraded antennas (big house, the main AP can't cover well two rooms in opposite directions)

    If I could, the isp router would put a nice ethernet cable straight into the external card of Untangle, then right out of the internal card a nice gigabit switch and again ethernet cables going everywhere. This however poses a few problems, first the server isn't welcome in the room with the phone line, secondly the cables would go across the house. They'll never agree to that, just imagine that before the powerline became a thing it was a wifi bridge. THAT was a nightmare, I remember that a router had antennas so bad, the bridge dropped packets! And that's when we got the first set of powerline adapters.

    I see you feel pain for the crazy circus that my home network is and almost every single thing you said is exactly how I'd do things if I could because... it's the right way. Then again I can't :-(

  2. #12
    Untangle Ninja Jim.Alles's Avatar
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    Jul 2008
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    Central PA
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    Um,
    This:
    Then it gets out of another adapter and into a switch with lots of things plugged in, including both external and internal cards of the Untangle server.
    might have something to do with this:

    Quote Originally Posted by Stamp View Post
    it's a while that I see strong jitter on the connection but today I noticed it starts at Untangle.
    NGFW really does need to be in-line with your internet service. not plugged into two ports of one switch.

  3. #13
    Untangle Ninja jcoehoorn's Avatar
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    Mar 2010
    Location
    York, NE
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    1,878

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    The wifi router isn't there to give us wifi, it has inadequate power... it's there to lock out of the network the isp router.
    Let untangle do this for you instead. It can handle that easily, and your network will be so much better off. If you could put a wifi router there, you can put an untangle box there. You don't need a very large machine to run untangle at home these days. I put mine together for less than $200, it has about the same width and depth as my router, is only about twice as tall, and runs very quiet.
    Last edited by jcoehoorn; 05-17-2016 at 10:31 AM.
    Five time Microsoft ASP.Net MVP managing a Lenovo RD330 / E5-2420 / 16GB with Untangle 16.2 to protect 500Mbits for ~450 residential college students and associated staff and faculty

  4. #14
    Untangler
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    Aug 2014
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    Status update, the new card fixed the jitter! However after about 6 hours it increases the ping (and it's fixed only with a reboot)... so yay, I guess chipset confirmed unreliable? Just look at this -_-'



    I've ordered an Intel card, still sort of cheap but it better work.

    Quote Originally Posted by jcoehoorn View Post
    If you could put a wifi router there, you can put an untangle box there.
    And a wifi router, because the untangle box won't act like a switch and access point I think, but in case it would be interesting to see 4 ethernet connectors and a wireless card since it still needs to service 2-3 wireless + 2 wired devices in that room. Not to mention that 200 bucks aren't the best argument against keeping the current i5 in use

  5. #15
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Apr 2008
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    Phoenix, AZ
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    26,241

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    The problem with Realtek chipsets is the amount of processing that happens in real RAM, this competes with Untangle's need for real RAM. You can't page these operations, so if you want to use the softNICs you have to have more RAM and CPU to compensate for them. Intel makes similar chipsets, but they tend to work better. The driver is more mature on the linux platform, and tends to be more reliable. However, that still doesn't mean a cheap $30 desktop NIC will always work. Though, honestly... most of the time those are fine.
    Stamp likes this.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

  6. #16
    Untangler
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    Aug 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by sky-knight View Post
    However, that still doesn't mean a cheap $30 desktop NIC will always work. Though, honestly... most of the time those are fine.
    After a whole day, I can say this is the case. The new Intel card is running flawlessly and I'm extremely happy

  7. #17
    Untangler
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    Aug 2014
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    I wanted to edit my previous post but apparently I can't, not after a week anyway.

    Since this might be useful to somebody, the card is working just perfect on Untangle 12 and it's an Intel EXPI9301CT

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