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  1. #1
    Untangler
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    Question Definition of 'user' for appliance sizing?

    I am considering an Untangle Appliance for my home network.
    In order to decide what appliance would suit my situation best I was reading the specs and the u25 is advised up to 25 users.
    But what is the definition of a user?
    I only have 4 family members (users?) but easily over 25 devices, amongst which also IoT devices and IP Cams that generate continuous traffic.
    Would those devices count as a user?

  2. #2
    Untangler jcoffin's Avatar
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    https://support.untangle.com/hc/en-u...on-NG-Firewall

    Any device behind the Untangle which has non-bypassed sessions across the Untangle is counted.

    You can bypass devices as needed.
    Attention: Support and help on the Untangle Forums is provided by
    volunteers and community members like yourself.
    If you need Untangle support please call or email support@untangle.com

  3. #3
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Yeah, the word "user" should be dropped. Untangle doesn't do per "user" anything, it's all per device.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

  4. #4
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    Question

    Maybe I should have been more clear in the background of my question.

    I didn't mean from a license perspective but from a sizing/performance perspective.
    As far as I understand the Home-Pro license doesn't have any license limitations on users/devices. (hope this is indeed correct)


    So from a sizing/performance perspective: would a u25 appliance be sufficient for a - little above average - home network?
    (u25 used as a gateway/ router and not a transparant bridge)

    Home- network consisting of 1 PC, 10-12 mobile devices (iPhones, iPads, Laptops, etc), 7 IP cams, 2 NAS's, 10-15 IoT/wired devices (media players, smart TV's, game consoles etc etc)
    Obviously not all concurrent usage and some generating a lot of traffic (IP CAMS), some generating hardly any network traffic (smart TV in standby)


    Any experiences/thoughts/advise?

  5. #5
    Master Untangler Sam Graf's Avatar
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    It's a fuzzy question, regrettably, even though it seems like it should be a fairly straightforward, concrete one. Some of fuzzies, in question form, include:
    • Will my device count grow meaningfully over the life of the appliance (for example, will I need to accommodate guests)?
    • What Untangle apps do I intend to use?
    • Which devices on my network will be monitored, and which won't?
    • Will I be keeping extensive logs?

    My instinctive response to the question is that I would use a u50 over a u25 because of the additional RAM (this is the crucial one, I think) and drive space. The extra NIC might be useful for network segmentation—perhaps a good idea in your scenario. The caveat on all the appliances is "up to," and I tend to prefer plenty of margin unless I know that my "users and their devices" count includes significant bypasses.

    Just my

  6. #6
    Untangle Ninja jcoehoorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homenetwork View Post
    would a u25 appliance be sufficient for a - little above average - home network?
    Yes, the u25 will handle your home network just fine.

    Unless you have fiber (gigabit). Then you want a u25x.

    Just to be safe, though, I might buy add a cheap 8 port switch so the cameras can connect directly to the recorder without needing to go through Untangle to do it. I would never want IP cameras running on my home wifi, no matter what kind of router I had, and I like to keep that traffic off of Untangle in general.
    Last edited by jcoehoorn; 08-24-2018 at 07:14 AM.
    Five time Microsoft ASP.Net MVP managing a Lenovo RD330 / E5-2420 / 16GB with Untangle 14.2.2 to protect 500Mbits for ~450 residential college students and associated staff and faculty

  7. #7
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    FWIW my home network isn't too terribly dissimilar to yours. I bought a u25x because I always try to buy more capacity than I think I'll need. I've had 0 issues attributable to processing power or general performance. All in all it's kicking butt and not breaking a sweat.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcoehoorn View Post
    ...
    Just to be safe, though, I might buy add a cheap 8 port switch so the cameras can connect directly to the recorder without needing to go through Untangle to do it. I would never want IP cameras running on my home wifi, no matter what kind of router I had, and I like to keep that traffic off of Untangle in general.
    Indeed that sounds very logical.

    But with the risk of going 'off topic'.... in this thread (https://forums.untangle.com/networki...e-network.html) I was given the 'advise' the put the IP cams on the 2nd NIC and isolate them with a firewall rule from the other devices in the network on the 1st NIC (including my NAS that acts as IP CAM recorder).

    Security-wise exactely what I was aiming for. Performance-wise not. This will indeed make all the traffic go through Untangle..

    Any suggestion how to make all the IP cam traffic stay 'behind' a switch but still satisfy my wish to seperate the IP cams from the rest of the network (including the NAS)?

    Since I am still a newbie on Untangle I prefer a fool proof setup...

  9. #9
    Master Untangler deleted_account+152373@untangle.com's Avatar
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    "Any suggestion how to make all the IP cam traffic stay 'behind' a switch but still satisfy my wish to seperate the IP cams from the rest of the network (including the NAS)?"

    Use a managed switch and put the devices you want on there own Vlan, also if you do not want the traffic passing through the firewall between vlans you need a layer 3 switch and setup Inter VLAN routing
    Last edited by Chrismal; 08-25-2018 at 04:54 AM.
    I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen

  10. #10
    Untangler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrismal View Post
    ...
    Use a managed switch and put the devices you want on there own Vlan, also if you do not want the traffic passing through the firewall between vlans you need a layer 3 switch and setup Inter VLAN routing
    ok thanks!
    VLANS are currently beyond my knowledge. Need to start to do some reading first

    First check for feasibility:
    Since I do not wire each device individually I have quite some secondary or even tertiary switches in my home network.
    ( I mean switch after a switch after the main router/switch ...)
    Do they all need to be managed switches in that case?

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