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Thread: Speed issues?

  1. #1
    Untangler
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    Default Speed issues?

    Not sure where to file this issue.
    I have a Qotom box with the Celeron J1900 and 8gb of ram. I've used it to run Untangle Home now for the past year with no issues.
    I upgraded to v15.0 from 14.2, and now the listed network speed for the internal networks is all listed at 100Mbit versus 1Gbit on the WAN.
    I've rebooted the box, and the internal networks will periodically show up as 1Gbit, then change back to 100Mbit on the GUI.
    Not sure if it is a bug, or something I need to check a box on.

    This in turn screws up the Unifi stack into thinking it is connected to 100Mbit.

    Ideas?

    Screenshot_20200306_110807.png

  2. #2
    Untangle Ninja Jim.Alles's Avatar
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    Default

    Hi, I have not seen this previously.
    I can't point to a document, but I am fairly certain the speed column is the negotiated speed. If you see it flipping, it is likely a hardware issue.

    I would start by replacing the patch cable on that interface.
    I would not recommend crimping your own connections.

    Be aware that 1GB links require all 8 conductors (4 pairs) to work. Not all factory cables have all four. Some devices ship with 2 pair (4C) cables.

    more details on your hardware and network layout might be helpful.

  3. #3
    Untangle Ninja f1assistance's Avatar
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    Do you have a switch(es) in the flow?
    Vanguard Untangle...because nothing's worse than doing nothing!
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    2, Pentium (R) Dual-Core CPU E5300 @ 2.60GHz 2599.968, 2089.96MB RAM
    And building #7 didn't kill itself!

  4. #4
    Untangler
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    Default

    @Jim.Alles
    Thank you for the prompt response!
    I will start by replacing the patch cable, however I have always crimped my own then tested them before making the connections.
    Qotom box with the J1900 Celeron processor, 8gb of ram, and two realtech rtl8111/8168/8411 PCI express Gigabit controllers.
    Again, no issues with what was listed when I ran v14.2.


    And after I reseated the patch cable it went back to 1Gbit. Weird, perhaps I should have done this first. Now I see how dusty everything is, so will make that a rainy day project!

  5. #5
    Untangler
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    Default

    Yes, two UniFi Switch 8 POE-150W. I initially noticed the degraded connection on the Unifi CP, thought it might be an issue with a recent firmware update, then looked at the Untangle CP, and saw what was listed in the photo.
    It appears to have resolved once I reseated the RJ-45 plug for the LAN.
    And the Unifi is now showing 1Gbit connection as well.

  6. #6
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Default

    Fair warning, crimp your own cables for gigabit and greater velocities at your own risk.

    And no, that conductivity tester isn't good enough.

    What you just went through is just one of the reasons why, there are sadly so many more... and it gets buckets worse when you try to hit 10gbit.
    f1assistance and Jim.Alles like this.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

  7. #7
    Untangler
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    Default

    Screenshot_20200306_120815.png
    Screenshot_20200306_121859.png

    @sky-knight, thanks for the tip. I will keep this in mind. How do the pro's install cabling, buy custom cables? Or run a better tester?

  8. #8
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Both... I wind up crimping stuff way too often. But it's getting harder to justify. The preformed cables are too cheap, and too readily available at any reasonable length. Then you wind up with the general issues of manufacturing. In your case, I doubt the quality of the crimp is really at play, given the distances involved are less than 10ft presumably... but if you had a NIC that was doing 100mbit, and not 1000... and a reseat fixed it, that means that before you reseated it you had an electrical contact issue on pin 4,5,7 or 8. Were it on 1,2, 3 or 6 even 10mbit would have failed, much less 100mbit. Which means one of the modular connectors on the cable is deformed in some way. Or perhaps just the manufacturing tolerance of that particular hunk of plastic is a bad match with your Untangle's or Switch's port...

    So your system restarts for the v15 update, this reinitialized your NIC, and it renegotiates at a lower speed to compensate for a detected lack of connectivity. This event has nothing to do with the upgrade, it's just the restart reset the driver and restarted the auto-negotiation process. And it comes out the other side with a working configuration, despite an electrical defect, and the electrical defect in question MUST HAVE been causing frame loss prior to the reboot that went unnoticed. That frame loss no doubt manifested in various ways, all of which should have triggered an alert from either your Unifi gear, or your Untangle, meanwhile your Internet connection is bouncing around like a Jack Russel Terrier... or at least should have been.

    And if that isn't enough to melt your brain... there's an even simpler solution. On boot your Intel interface decided it didn't like your Unifi switch. Setting the link speed to "auto" is known to cause this sort of thing from time to time. Which is why some grizzled old Cisco guys will beat you over the head and tell you to manually configure the speed and duplex and stop being an idiot. Personally I don't like doing this because it prevents the interface from failing back. Having a gigabit link fall back to 100mbit is annoying sure, but it's not DOWN, which is what the static configuration creates. But down isn't half broken and weird... and gets fixed faster because it's more noticeable. YMMV and all that.
    Last edited by sky-knight; 03-06-2020 at 10:36 AM.
    f1assistance likes this.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

  9. #9
    Untangler
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    Default

    @sky-knight
    Thanks for the reply. I do have some long runs, from the house to the garage in conduit that runs underneath the driveway. I don't think I would have managed to get all of them through the conduit with plugs at the end.
    As for the upgrade, I don't think it had anything to do with it either. Just trying to talk/write things out. My wife was giving me a quizzical look when I discovered this issue this morning, and I'm sitting at my desk talking to myself, and of course, answering myself.
    Seems odd that the connector would sort of unseat itself, however I did notice that the Qotom box was not sitting right either, so something moved it. However there were no finger marks in the dust(ugh, dust). Such is the plight of every indoor woodstove user. I've contemplated moving the cabinet to a closet farther away. Perhaps it is time. However this weekend I will shut everything down, and dust the hell out of the cabinet.
    I think I've always used autonegotiation for that reason, a simple fallback.

  10. #10
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Long runs are permanent and can't be manufactured. But here's the rub... those are SOLID conductor cables, and SHOULD NEVER be crimped. Those lines are to be terminated with a 110 style termination block, or RJ45 female ends matching the appropriate category standard.

    RJ45 modular terminators are for BRAIDED cables, huge difference. And if you use braided wire in the wall or conduit... it'll break over time because gravity wreaks havoc on the copper ropes you've got in there. Use of a modular connector on a solid cable creates a very weak connection, one that will break given time and even light movement.

    Dust... that is a solid culprit. It works its way into everything. Does your Untangle server have any sort of active cooling? Variable speed fans will actuate to full RPM during a reboot, that boost of vibration can be all it takes to allow a spec of dust to move one of those gold fingers. Re-seating the plug is the best you can do in those circumstances. But every RJ45 female to RJ45 male connection will fall prey to dust creep eventually... it's just the nature of the beast. If you think about it, and look at it objectively... it really is a terrible connection. 8 golden fingers laying in a track made out of plastic? Held by some very small wire surface tension?

    It's one of those things I look at and wonder... how the heck does it not go wrong more than it does? But it fits right in with most other communications tech we've built the Internet out of... it's all like that... and yet... it works!
    Last edited by sky-knight; 03-06-2020 at 11:53 AM.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

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