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  1. #1
    Master Untangler
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    Jan 2010
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    108

    Default UEFI vs Legacy BIOS Boot

    Getting ready to replace my current Untangle Server with a Smaller Computer and was wondering if there are any advantages of doing a new Fresh install with UEFI Boot vs Legacy BIOS Boot..? My system supports either... I know that I have to have Secure Boot disabled in UEFI Mode, but didn't know if there were any specific advantages that one boot method had over the over for a Firewall...

  2. #2
    Untangler jcoffin's Avatar
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    Aug 2008
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    9,665

    Default

    It is rarely a benefit.
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  3. #3
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Default

    UEFI is technically faster, and provides features that BIOS doesn't.

    But if BIOS works, who cares? I use what works. Windows stations end users break on the daily are a different matter.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

  4. #4
    Untangle Ninja jcoehoorn's Avatar
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    Mar 2010
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    York, NE
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    Default

    Here are some advantages to UEFI vs BIOS:

    • Defense against certain kinds of malware, especially firmware attacks
    • Build systems that pxe boot from enterprise storage
    • Build systems that use pxe to automatically deploy or redeploy an OS as needed
    • Install on certain newer systems that no longer do BIOS emulation
    • Install to a boot partition larger than 2TB (you could work around this with a separate /boot partition, but with UEFI that's no longer needed on a large drive)
    • Better support for live migrations with some hypervisors (you could take an untangle guest VM instance running on one physical host and move it to another host without shutting it down)... assuming you can also move the network interfaces you need at the same time (which is also possible with some SDN-capable switches)
    • Better integration with some types of hardware monitors and tiny server LCD screens.
    • Better support for onboard management/KVM solutions like IMM/ILO/IDRAC.
    • Better NVMe support


    Most of this doesn't really help Untangle at this time.
    Last edited by jcoehoorn; 06-30-2021 at 07:53 AM.
    Five time Microsoft ASP.Net MVP managing a Lenovo RD330 / E5-2420 / 16GB with Untangle 16.2 to protect 500Mbits for ~450 residential college students and associated staff and faculty

  5. #5
    Untangler
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
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    51

    Default

    Just use UEFI. It doesn't really matter if it's bios or uefi. The big benefit for me to use UEFI is if the hardware fails, i can simply move the hdd/ssd to another hardware and it just works. if you use bios, there is a big chance it will not work for some PC which has UEFI only and no BIOS legacy fallback.

  6. #6
    Master Untangler
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    108

    Default

    Thanks everyone... I went ahead and installed using UEFI... Seems to be working great... Just working on re-configuring everything before I put it in place... I have a 4 port Intel PCIe NIC and a 2 port PCIe NIC installed and the ordering of a couple of the ports is flipped flopped from one card to the other... Trying to decide if I really need that 2nd 2 port NIC...

  7. #7
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Default

    That means your main board can't make up its mind how to enumerate it's PCIE bus.

    And that means if you want the thing to be reliable, you get to create custom link files to map MAC addresses of your interfaces to a specific eth flag. If you don't, on every reboot... stuff blows up.

    https://wiki.debian.org/NetworkInter...NG_.LINK_FILES
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

  8. #8
    Master Untangler
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    Jan 2010
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    Default

    I looked at that link last night but couldn't figure out exactly what I needed to do in the link file to map all 6 ports to the appropriate eth flags (eth0 - eth5)... With only the 4 port NIC installed, all 4 ports are properly labeled eth0, eth1, eth2, eth3 all in a row... But with both the 4 port NIC and the 2 port NIC installed the ports on the 4 port NIC get labeled eth0, eth1, eth2, eth4 and the ports on the 2 port NIC get labeled eth3, eth5.... And it stays the same after every reboot... The last port on the 4 port NIC gets switched with the 1st port on the 2 port NIC... I don't guess it really maters what the ports are labeled, as long as it stays the same after each reboot, and it seems to stay the same after each reboot I have done... But I may never use any more than 4 ports for my home network anyway... I just had an extra 2 port NIC and a free PCIe slot and figured why not install it just in case I may ever need it...

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