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  1. #1
    Untangler
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    Default Need help subnetting my network

    I have a simple task that is absolutely driving me crazy. I am almost embarassed to have to ask, but I need to subnet a network into three subnets. My AP is connected directly into my Untangle box, which is configured with a static ip address of 192.168.1.1 /27 (DHCP is enabled). This "should" allow me to configure 8 subnets. If a pc is connected to the LAN interface, I have internet access. If, instead, I connect the LAN interface to a switch I "should" be able to connect a router to that switch and subnet this network. If someone could assist me with configuring just one of these routers, I would be most appreciative.



    What has been done:



    Asus RT-N16 (router being configured)

    1. Has been configured with a static IP address of 192.168.1.97 and subnet mask 255.255.255.224
    2. Has been placed in "Router" mode. (This disables NAT to allow communication and sharing services among LAN and WAN clients.)
    3. Firewall has been disabled.
    4. A static LAN route has been assigned to 192.168.1.1 (UT servers IP) I am uncertain as to what figure should be placed in the "Metric" field, however.)





    STILL NO INTERNET ACCESS ?!?!?!?

    *** Can anyone at least confirm I am headed in the right direction with this? ***
    Last edited by Theoutdoorsman; 03-04-2011 at 07:13 PM.

  2. #2
    Untangle Ninja mrunkel's Avatar
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    Default

    I really don't understand what you're trying to do. A map (check my signature) would be really helpful.

    I'll start with routing basics:

    1.) In order to communicate directly with each other, devices must be in the same IP subnet.
    2.) If you want full communication, each device in the network must have a full routing table. <- this is especially true for the upstream device.
    3.) End devices don't need routes, just a default gateway.

    So, my suggestions:

    1.) Don't bother subnetting 192.168.1.0/24 into smaller bits. You have 254 other subnets to choose from.
    2.) Draw a map like I suggest in my other post (see my sig). Each device that plugs into a subnet gets an IP from that subnet. When a device is dual homed (like a router) it gets an IP from each respective subnet.
    3.) Routing table entries should have a locally reachable IP as the next hop. Technically this isn't true, but unless you really really understand why you're doing that, you shouldn't.
    m.


    Big Frickin Disclaimer:
    While I'm pretty sure, I can't guarantee that I know what I'm doing. There might be a better way to do this, and this way might actually suck. Make sure you understand the implications of what you're doing before trying to follow these directions.

    It often helps troubleshooting if you have a good network map. Look here if you want my advice on how to draw one.
    Attention: Support and help on the Untangle Forums is provided by volunteers and community members like yourself.
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  3. #3
    Untangler
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    Default

    I am trying to subnet my network into two indipendent networks. My router recieves its WAN IP address via the Untangle DHCP server. I assigned a LAN IP address of 192.168.1.97 255.255.255.224 to the router. Here is what I have thus far....



    AP --> Untangle Server (192.168.1.1 225.255.255.224) --> Switch --> Router (192.168.1.97 255.255.255.224)

    1.) Don't bother subnetting 192.168.1.0/24 into smaller bits.
    Are you suggesting, here, that I go with subnet:

    192.168.2.0 /27 ?



    Does that help? Please stay with me. With a little guidance, I can get through this fairly quick I think. Thanks for the reply!
    Last edited by Theoutdoorsman; 03-04-2011 at 08:00 PM.

  4. #4
    Untangle Ninja dwasserman's Avatar
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    Default

    Why not add a third interface to untangle for this job?
    The world is divided into 10 kinds of people, who know binary and those not

  5. #5
    Untangler
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    Default

    I do not have an extra NIC, but I do have routers. I am attempting to use what I have on hand. Anyone?

  6. #6
    Untangler
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    I tried setting the two interfaces up on a /24 network:

    UT= 192.168.1.1 /24
    Asus RT-N16 Router= 192.168.2.1 /24


    STILL NO JOY!!! WTF!!!

    Can someone please help with this. I am going NUTS~!~

  7. #7
    Untangler
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    Default

    Here is a network map for you to go by. I am only concerned with the configuration of one of the routers. The other, I should be able to configure on my own. This should be a simple project, but I am loosing hair FAST!

    Last edited by Theoutdoorsman; 03-05-2011 at 12:29 AM.

  8. #8
    Untangle Ninja
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    Default

    I'm assuming between "internet cloud" and "Untangle Server" there's some sort of modem/router device from your ISP, and that's what's giving you the 192.168.1.0/24 network? and you have Untangle setup in bridge mode? what is the default route to the internet? 192.168.1.254?

    If you want to set it up the way you've drawn it, you'd connect the WAN port of each router to the Netgear switch. Setup the WAN connection in static mode, give the first one an address like 192.168.1.10 / 24, the other one 192.168.1.20 / 24.

    Then setup the 192.168.2.1 address on the lan side of the first router, and enable the DHCP server. Likewise on the second, setup 192.168.3.1 on the lan side and enable it's dhcp server.

    This setup will give you double-NAT though, which mostly works but can cause problems. You won't be able to communicate between the 192.168.2.0 and 192.168.3.0 networks, but I assume that's what you want. The untangle box will only see the two WAN side IP's of the ASUS routers, it won't know anything about the individual PC's behind them. I'm not sure this is what you want, but that's what you've drawn.

    (note if the assumptions I made in the first paragraph are wrong, then the rest is wrong too.)

    edit: ok, I read your first post again and see you can disable NAT on the ASUS routers... they didn't look like the sort that you could do that with. that invalidates what I said above
    Last edited by johnsonx42; 03-05-2011 at 01:13 AM.

  9. #9
    Untangle Ninja
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    forget my last post... just answer this:

    is untangle set in bridge mode or router mode?

    if router mode, then 192.168.1.1 is the Internal ip, yes?

  10. #10
    Untangler
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnsonx42 View Post
    forget my last post... just answer this:

    is untangle set in bridge mode or router mode?

    if router mode, then 192.168.1.1 is the Internal ip, yes?


    I have assigned the static IP Address, 192.168.1.1, to the internal interface in the UT server (Yes). My network is EXACTLY as shown in the diagram. I do not have a modem/router sitting between the UT Server and cloud. Thanks for your assistance. I will await further instructions/advice. To save on confusion, let's concentrate on ONLY the 192.168.2.1 router for the moment. Once I understand this, I will configure the other router on my own. (It receives its WAN address via DHCP from the UT Server.)
    Last edited by Theoutdoorsman; 03-05-2011 at 08:41 AM.

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