Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    9

    Default Speed Test Monitoring

    Hi all-

    Iíve been running untangle for a couple months and really like it. Iím wondering if there is a way for me to have my untangle box run and internet speed test a few times a day and alert me if it reports speeds below a specific threshold. Iíd like to know if Iím consistently getting the internet speeds Iím paying for without checking every so often from my computer.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Master Untangler
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    712

    Default

    Not really, no. You could hack something together on the command line, but be warned that doing that won't show up in the GUI and break, or get broken by, future upgrades.

  3. #3
    Untangle Ninja jcoehoorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    York, NE
    Posts
    1,849

    Default

    Remember that the speed is shared among your entire network. Speed tests work because they download as much as they can while the test run. This has two consequences that make automated tests problematic:

    1. They slow your connection while the test runs
    2. If anything else on your network is using the internet, the test results will be wrong by the amount used by those other connections

    In other words, automated tests make your connection worse and don't provide good data.
    JasonJoel likes this.
    Five time Microsoft ASP.Net MVP managing a Lenovo RD330 / E5-2420 / 16GB with Untangle 16.2 to protect 500Mbits for ~450 residential college students and associated staff and faculty

  4. #4
    Untangler
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    365

    Default

    If you want to write that script here is a starting point.
    Code:
    curl -s https://raw.githubusercontent.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/master/speedtest.py | python -
    Please share it if you do.

    Good luck

  5. #5
    Untangle Junkie dmorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    San Carlos, CA
    Posts
    17,747

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jcoehoorn View Post
    Remember that the speed is shared among your entire network. Speed tests work because they download as much as they can while the test run. This has two consequences that make automated tests problematic:

    1. They slow your connection while the test runs
    2. If anything else on your network is using the internet, the test results will be wrong by the amount used by those other connections

    In other words, automated tests make your connection worse and don't provide good data.
    This exactly. Thank you for posting this.

    I really like this idea in general, but I haven't found any good way to do it.
    I more like the idea of disabling QoS quickly to see what the speed goes to during natural high load or some hack like that. Obviously that is risky as well and could also have serious negative side effects.
    Attention: Support and help on the Untangle Forums is provided by volunteers and community members like yourself.
    If you need Untangle support please call or email support@untangle.com

  6. #6
    Untangle Ninja jcoehoorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    York, NE
    Posts
    1,849

    Default

    Thinking about this more, I could see this being useful on home networks in spite of what I posted earlier... IF the test was scheduled in the wee hours of the morning, set up in such a way that it watched for the tested WAN interface to remain reasonably idle (say, less than 5% configured capacity) for at least several minutes before starting, and could also automatically bypass QoS limits for the test.

    But larger networks would never meet the idle condition, and those are some tough requirements even for small home networks. You think you're idle, and all of a sudden a PC wakes up and starts downloading Windows Updates and throws the whole thing off. Or your phone decides it's time to update some apps. Or a teenager in the house leaves a Spotify stream going all night.
    Last edited by jcoehoorn; 04-04-2018 at 08:16 AM.
    Five time Microsoft ASP.Net MVP managing a Lenovo RD330 / E5-2420 / 16GB with Untangle 16.2 to protect 500Mbits for ~450 residential college students and associated staff and faculty

  7. #7
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jcoehoorn View Post
    Thinking about this more, I could see this being useful on home networks in spite of what I posted earlier... IF the test was scheduled in the wee hours of the morning, set up in such a way that it watched for the tested WAN interface to remain reasonably idle (say, less than 5% configured capacity) for at least several minutes before starting, and could also automatically bypass QoS limits for the test.

    But larger networks would never meet the idle condition, and those are some tough requirements even for small home networks. You think you're idle, and all of a sudden a PC wakes up and starts downloading Windows Updates and throws the whole thing off. Or your phone decides it's time to update some apps. Or a teenager in the house leaves a Spotify stream going all night.
    I was thinking exactly as you mentioned about running it sometime in the middle of the night. Youíre point about checking to see if the WAN interface is idle first is a good one. After doing some more googling there are a few different python scripts to run a test against speed-test-dot-net. Perhaps I will build on one of those and add in threshold based alerts. To monitor the WAN interface I would need to run it on my untangle box, but not sure if thatís a good idea. Maybe Iíll start with getting it working on one of my Linux boxes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Master Untangler
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    712

    Default

    But what is the point of knowing your bandwidth in the middle of the night during non-peak times??? I see no value in that whatsoever.

    If you aren't testing during peak or high load times, the data is meaningless as BY DEFINITION you don't have a problem when you are testing (that's why you chose that time to test in the first place)... And you can't test during peak or high load times (when you really want to know the available bandwidth) without affecting the production systems.

    It seems this is more of an academic discussion, rather than a feature that actually adds any value.

  9. #9
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonJoel View Post
    But what is the point of knowing your bandwidth in the middle of the night during non-peak times??? I see no value in that whatsoever.

    If you aren't testing during peak or high load times, the data is meaningless as BY DEFINITION you don't have a problem when you are testing (that's why you chose that time to test in the first place)... And you can't test during peak or high load times (when you really want to know the available bandwidth) without affecting the production systems.

    It seems this is more of an academic discussion, rather than a feature that actually adds any value.
    Maybe I should have started out with my problem statement. Iím supposed to be getting 300mb/sec from my ISP. I had an issue in the past where somehow they moved me down to 150 and it took me a few weeks to notice. Iíd like to monitor this so I know immediately if it happens again.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Untangle Ninja YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonJoel View Post
    But what is the point of knowing your bandwidth in the middle of the night during non-peak times??? I see no value in that whatsoever.

    If you aren't testing during peak or high load times, the data is meaningless as BY DEFINITION you don't have a problem when you are testing (that's why you chose that time to test in the first place)... And you can't test during peak or high load times (when you really want to know the available bandwidth) without affecting the production systems.

    It seems this is more of an academic discussion, rather than a feature that actually adds any value.
    That's a blind way to look at it. Most of us know that, to get the most accurate rating of your connection to your ISP, you want to run the speed test with as little traffic as possible from all the other devices on your network. Ideally...you'd go onsite, disconnect your switch from the gateway, plug your laptop into the gateway..thus your laptop is the only device on the network..and run your speed tests. Also plug laptop into your ISPs CPE, bypassing the gateway, to get an even more accurate test and bypass your own router (which model CPE the ISP has of course can determine if this is possible or not).

    For many of us that manage other networks..such as business networks, the OPs point of running tests at the middle of the night actually makes sense (for most of us). For reasons that should be obvious...the business is closed, nobody else is there such as other end users on the network are not busy streaming youboob or pandora or sending/receiving email, blah blah blah. You can safely consider the network consists of a lot of workstations powered off, sitting idle, sleep mode, whatever. You'd get a roughly more accurate reading of your actual network speeds versus trying to run it during the middle of the day when the network is filled with users busy doing online stuff.

    Yes...if computers are left running one can state that there is always traffic going out the gateway causing more traffic, such as Microsoft updates trickle downloading, antivirus updates, 3rd party updates, various DNS requests and other phone-home requests, but hopefully as an IT guy you have your finger on the pulse of your clients network and are aware of that and have it all under control...or be able to shut off that traffic such as rolling up your sleeves and utilizing the services of a managed switch.

    Many other router/firewall vendors are doing this, it's becoming quite popular now. While I still prefer doing it manually myself, to set QoS rules by taking 85% of the tested/benchmarked bandwidth, you'll see some implementations by other vendors done quite well, such as Ubiquiti with their USG products. You can run a few speed tests, and from those results you can have it set the QoS (queues) rules based on those results. I can see some other network techs being spoiled by those QoS wizards and wanting to see this feature on other brands. It's not unreasonable.
    Resident "Geek on a Harley" in Southeast Connecticut, USA.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2