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  1. #1
    Master Untangler
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    Default Link Aggregation from cable modem

    Has there been any development on the possibility of using link aggregation? Basically would there be a way to use two incoming Wan connections? Would I use wan balancing to utilize this? Is there a good setup regarding this function?

  2. #2
    Untangler jcoffin's Avatar
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    WAN Balancer will split going sessions but it will not bind the two WANs.
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  3. #3
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    Link Aggregation doesn't do what you think it does...

    LAG allows you to bond multiple network interfaces, into a single logical network interface that connects once to a single network.

    Let that sink in... a SINGLE network.

    The feature you want is provided by WAN Balancer, and WAN Fail over. The former grants the ability to direct egress traffic out multiple WAN links based on load percentages. The latter allows Untangle to manage the reality of an up or down WAN interface.

    This process will NOT bond your connections. And you will NEVER gain the ability to download or upload a single session at the combined speeds of both connections. What it will do is allow one computer to use one connection at its speed, and another computer the other.

    Indeed without a VPN of some sort to act as an aggregator, there is literally no way possible to bond connections between multiple ISPs.

    Oh, and you'll notice I said egress traffic up there, ingress traffic is handled outside of your network. Connections will land based on the client on the far side making it. So if DNS points at one, or the other, or even both, the clients will make their determination and connect. It's up to you to deal with incoming connections on both to manage that.

    Interestingly enough if all you care about is ingress, Untangle doesn't require the paid multi-wan modules to function. You simply need to have an interface configured and connected to a given ISP, and it will act on that network. Ingress traffic will be handled in accordance to port forward rules. Untangle however will only use one WAN at a time for routing interior traffic. But honestly, that configuration is rather silly, WAN Balancer is cheap, and it comes with WAN failover, buy the features if you want to multi-wan.

    And good luck planning, because building services to use more than one WAN link isn't as trivial as it seems either.
    Last edited by sky-knight; 10-02-2019 at 03:43 PM.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

  4. #4
    Master Untangler
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    I guess in my head it's simple. Have 2 Wan ports and bridge the two together. I'm guessing this is actually similar to three phase power rather simply plugging in two ports.

  5. #5
    Untangle Ninja sky-knight's Avatar
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    That's actually not a bad analog, if you have 3 phase 360v power, you've got three separate 120V AC phases to work with. You can use all three for 360v, or 2 for 208v, or 1 for 120v.

    But the key note of similarity here is you have one "line" that supplies that power from a single utility. What you're trying to do is tie two connections together, which would be like trying to bridge between two grid segments that each have their own generation. It can be done, but it's a bucket harder than just hooking up a wire, lest that wire and anyone nearby become very short lived lightbulbs!

    Fortunately bandwidth isn't that unforgiving. I'm not sure what service you're running internally that you want to accelerate via a 2nd WAN, but if it's HTTP or HTTPs, that's fairly easy. You have two public addresses, on two WAN interfaces, with port forward rules to push TCP 443 traffic to your web server. Then you simply update your A record that resolves to the current WAN, to instead resolve to both addresses. The clients will round robin themselves between them, because that's how DNS works! No single connection can be any faster than the WAN they are using, but you can now handle two of them at presumably similar speeds at a time thanks to the 2nd WAN.

    In vehicle terms, you've increased torque, but not horsepower.

    But the world still sees two separate servers serving the same stuff, not one server. If you need one mega fast server, and you're running into bandwidth constraints honestly, the fastest way out is to migrate to the cloud. P2V or V2V that thing up into Azure, and all your worries vanish, at least in terms of world to asset bandwidth. Site to asset bandwidth might requires some more work, but that means faster Internet at the office in question, not necessarily a second connection.
    Rob Sandling, BS:SWE, MCP
    NexgenAppliances.com
    Phone: 866-794-8879 x201
    Email: support@nexgenappliances.com

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